Krystian Sokolowski Fashion Design Masculinity
Photo courtesy of Vincent Ludwig
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The concept of masculinity provokes my humour. It forces men to dress up in the identity predesigned by society, which is of course the result of our culture, yet at the same time as this identity develops, it draws a barrier of common sense around the expectations we have towards our distinctiveness. The world we live in today has a habit of composing ready-made grids, personally appreciated by me in most cases; on the other hand we have the motion of progression that gives us the beauty of challenging these patterns, on a social and existential level. Without going into detail on why the structures of our civilisation look the way they do, let me just say that we seem to be okay with the fact that this very order puts us in different categories defining our purpose and arranging our lives according to the mediocre standards of our community. The problem with this perfect plan is that it is uncompromising towards alternative circumstances, leaving individual members of society in the position of the outcast. Religion, Catholicism in particular, was the main focus of my research on the topic of masculine values and the social grid of common ideals, that is, the skeleton of the ethical propaganda and the structure of the institutional immorality. Men have graced themselves with the privilege of power, the long lasting heritage that is present to this day have guaranteed the continuity of the established rules, nowadays called traditions. As the purpose of this institution is to primarily preserve old values, the chance of a change is unlikely. And perhaps this is the reason why the priesthood become one of the synonyms of masculinity, through the default of women and the sinful obsession with power by the male members of the Christian institution. Throughout my process I have analysed the visual language of the garments worn by the leader of the Catholic Church - The Pope. The ceremonial feeling these garments conduct in the celebration of the worship inspired me. I felt that as the guardianship of these rituals keeps the development frozen, the necessity of modernity becomes more present. The aim of this project was to translate different elements of the clothes into more contemporary versions, while still keeping the recognisable silhouette. One of the major parts of the garments is the embroideries on the sculptural sleeves, inspired by the shape of the cape. The white flowers are hand sawn onto the piece and symbolise the paradoxical side of masculinity within the Catholic Church. The garments in their totality represent the absurdity of modern characteristics we receive while analysing the common understanding of masculinity.
Outfits
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MASCULINITY
The concept of masculinity provokes my humour. It forces men to dress up in the identity predesigned by society, which is of course the result of our culture, yet at the same time as this identity develops, it draws a barrier of common sense around the expectations we have towards our distinctiveness. The world we live in today has a habit of composing ready-made grids, personally appreciated by me in most cases; on the other hand we have the motion of progression that gives us the beauty of challenging these patterns, on a social and existential level. Without going into detail on why the structures of our civilisation look the way they do, let me just say that we seem to be okay with the fact that this very order puts us in different categories defining our purpose and arranging our lives according to the mediocre standards of our community. The problem with this perfect plan is that it is uncompromising towards alternative circumstances, leaving individual members of society in the position of the outcast. Religion, Catholicism in particular, was the main focus of my research on the topic of masculine values and the social grid of common ideals, that is, the skeleton of the ethical propaganda and the structure of the institutional immorality. Men have graced themselves with the privilege of power, the long lasting heritage that is present to this day have guaranteed the continuity of the established rules, nowadays called traditions. As the purpose of this institution is to primarily preserve old values, the chance of a change is unlikely. And perhaps this is the reason why the priesthood become one of the synonyms of masculinity, through the default of women and the sinful obsession with power by the male members of the Christian institution. Throughout my process I have analysed the visual language of the garments worn by the leader of the Catholic Church - The Pope. The ceremonial feeling these garments conduct in the celebration of the worship inspired me. I felt that as the guardianship of these rituals keeps the development frozen, the necessity of modernity becomes more present. The aim of this project was to translate different elements of the clothes into more contemporary versions, while still keeping the recognisable silhouette. One of the major parts of the garments is the embroideries on the sculptural sleeves, inspired by the shape of the cape. The white flowers are hand sawn onto the piece and symbolise the paradoxical side of masculinity within the Catholic Church. The garments in their totality represent the absurdity of modern characteristics we receive while analysing the common understanding of masculinity.
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Photo courtesy of Vincent Ludwig. Programmed by Vincent Ludwig.