Krystian Sokolowski Fashion Design Disabled
Photo courtesy of Vincent Ludwig
CLICK TO
ZOOM/CLOSE
PHOTO 1
PHOTO 2
Something we all do, despite our common courtesies. A common crime of childish curiosity - Staring. A sin potentially major, yet how tempting and seductive in it’s ordinary nature. Despite the innocent quality, this action can be unforgivable, especially if the object of our observation is in their most vulnerable state. We know it’s wrong but we do it anyway; hoping that our nosiness will remain unseen. To measure how bad exactly staring is, you must simply calculate the proportion of how much does the person wants to be unnoticed, parallel to the time of how long you have stared at them. Only then can you truly know how inconsiderate you have been. Joking aside, one of most cruel things one can do is to bring affliction to an already suffering being. I believe staring at a disable person fulfils this requirement. The starting point of this project was the topic of good and bad taste. I had a thought, since the fashion industry is mostly about the admiration of the appearance, besides the constant development of the commercial identity of course, it would be interesting to be inspired by the people we are not use to looking or staring at. The orthopaedic equipment designed to help with different kinds of disabilities was the main focus of my research. I tried to translate different elements of these pieces and introduce them into fashion language, playing with the original function and exchanging it into something applied, for more aesthetic purpose rather than the necessity of a medical nature.
Outfits
1/2 2/2
DISABLED
Something we all do, despite our common courtesies. A common crime of childish curiosity - Staring. A sin potentially major, yet how tempting and seductive in it’s ordinary nature. Despite the innocent quality, this action can be unforgivable, especially if the object of our observation is in their most vulnerable state. We know it’s wrong but we do it anyway; hoping that our nosiness will remain unseen. To measure how bad exactly staring is, you must simply calculate the proportion of how much does the person wants to be unnoticed, parallel to the time of how long you have stared at them. Only then can you truly know how inconsiderate you have been. Joking aside, one of most cruel things one can do is to bring affliction to an already suffering being. I believe staring at a disable person fulfils this requirement. The starting point of this project was the topic of good and bad taste. I had a thought, since the fashion industry is mostly about the admiration of the appearance, besides the constant development of the commercial identity of course, it would be interesting to be inspired by the people we are not use to looking or staring at. The orthopaedic equipment designed to help with different kinds of disabilities was the main focus of my research. I tried to translate different elements of these pieces and introduce them into fashion language, playing with the original function and exchanging it into something applied, for more aesthetic purpose rather than the necessity of a medical nature.
1/2 2/2
Photo courtesy of Vincent Ludwig. Programmed by Vincent Ludwig.